Manuel Ocampo

Manuel Ocampo: The Corrections

January 8, 2015 — February 14, 2015


ENLARGE

Las Plagas, 2014

silkscreen and oil on canvas

78 x 72 in. (198 x 183 cm)

ENLARGE

Elegua, 2014

silkscreen and oil on canvas

72 x 48 in. (183 x 122 cm)

ENLARGE

Islamic Disco Painting, 2014

silkscreen and oil on canvas

48 x 96 in. (122 x 244 cm)

ENLARGE

Scheiss, 2014

silkscreen and oil on canvas

72 x 50 in. (183 x 127 cm)

ENLARGE

Todos caeran, 2014

silkscreen and oil on canvas

72 x 48 in. (183 x 122 cm)

ENLARGE

Fashion Update, 2014

silkscreen and oil on canvas

72 x 48 in. (183 x 122 cm)

ENLARGE

Killing History, 2014

silkscreen and oil on canvas

48 x 48 in. (122 x 122 cm)

ENLARGE

Consumer Crisis, 2014

silkscreen and oil on canvas

74 x 78 in. (188 x 198 cm)

ENLARGE

Ubermensch, 2014

silkscreen and oil on canvas

60 x 48 in. (152 x 122 cm)

ENLARGE

La Liberté, 2014

silkscreen and oil on canvas

78 x 70 in. (198 x 178 cm)

ENLARGE

Untitled, 2014

oil on canvas

72 x 48 in. (183 x 122 cm)

ENLARGE

Untitled, 2014

oil on canvas

72 x 48 in. (183 x 122 cm)

ENLARGE

Untitled, 2014

oil on canvas

72 x 48 in. (183 x 122 cm)

ENLARGE

Installation View of "The Corrections" at Tyler Rollins Fine Art, January 8 - February 14, 2015

 

 

ENLARGE

Installation View of "The Corrections" at Tyler Rollins Fine Art, January 8 - February 14, 2015

 

 

ENLARGE

Installation View of "The Corrections" at Tyler Rollins Fine Art, January 8 - February 14, 2015

 

 

ENLARGE

Installation View of "The Corrections" at Tyler Rollins Fine Art, January 8 - February 14, 2015

 

 

ENLARGE

Installation View of "The Corrections" at Tyler Rollins Fine Art, January 8 - February 14, 2015

 

 

ENLARGE

Installation View of "The Corrections" at Tyler Rollins Fine Art, January 8 - February 14, 2015

 

 

ENLARGE

Installation View of "The Corrections" at Tyler Rollins Fine Art, January 8 - February 14, 2015

 

 

Works

INSTALLATION VIEWS

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION

Manuel Ocampo has been a vital presence on the international art scene for over twenty-five years, with a reputation for fearlessly tackling the taboos and cherished icons of society and of the art world itself. Now based in Manila, the Philippines, he had an extended residency in California in the late 1980s and early 1990s and continues to spend significant time working in both the US and Europe. For The Corrections, his third solo exhibition with Tyler Rollins Fine Art, Ocampo looks back with a critical eye on his early work, making “corrections” to certain key paintings from the early 1990s, which were inspired by his experience living in Los Angeles during a period of heightened racial tensions, culminating in the race riots of 1992. Imagery of race, religion, and violence had pervaded Ocampo’s work since the late 1980s, informed by the context of Los Angeles. “I felt that LA was no different from Manila,” he recalls; “the huge class disparity, the balkanization of communities, the political corruption, consumer culture, celebrity culture, the traffic, water shortages, etc. I guess I had a feeling that something like the riots was bound to happen. Being an immigrant from the Philippines, a former colony of the US and Spain, I wanted to bring these references into my work.” Ocampo created what he calls “mock history paintings,” an impressive example of which, Yo Mate A Historia (1991), is included in the current exhibition. These works reference the style and imagery of the Spanish Catholic painting of the Philippines, combined with motifs that evoke both the once commonplace racial caricatures of African Americans and the depictions of Filipinos in American political cartoons during the period of the brutal Philippine–American War of 1899–1902.

For The Corrections, Ocampo made silkscreens based on photographs of his older paintings, altering the images to resemble darkened and distorted photographic negatives. New interventions were then hand painted on top of these images, creating rich, multi-layered compositions that capture a sense of the passing of time, the evolution of consciousness, and the ongoing structuring of personal and group identities. One’s view of the works is perhaps inevitably colored by the current racially charged environment in the United States in the aftermath of a number of police shooting incidents around the country – although Ocampo emphasizes that “the works in the show were not really meant to comment on the current situation in the US, but accidentally it did. My concern in going back to the works I did over 20 years ago was that I wanted to re-examine the iconography I used back then and how I felt about ‘correcting’ them. In fact, what I mean by ‘correcting’ is to change their meaning, to depoliticize them.” The dark, disturbing imagery of the original paintings becomes literally darker, more obscured and abstracted. The older works’ strong socio-political commentary is less foregrounded – now not so much a loud proclamation but rather a more intimate expression of the artist’s own inner world. We get a sense of the artist wrestling with his own demons, with his own past and art. The record of this struggle is perhaps less seen in dramatic brushstrokes, the “hand of the artist,” but in the artist’s shoe-prints that appear all over the paintings, marks that are at once highly personal and yet strangely generic; they could be anyone’s prints, our own.

Born in 1965 in Manila, the Philippines, Ocampo had his first solo exhibition in 1988, in Los Angeles, setting the stage for a rapid rise to international prominence. By the early 1990s, his reputation was firmly established, with inclusion in two of the most important European art events, Documenta IX (1992) and the Venice Biennale (1993). 
Also in the early 1990s, he participated in the landmark exhibition, Helter Skelter: L.A. Art in the 1990s at The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (1992), as well as Individual Realities in the California Art Scene at the Sezon Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo (1991), and Jean-Michel Basquiat & Manuel Ocampo at the Henry Art Gallery, Seattle (1994). He has subsequently participated in numerous museum exhibitions and biennials around the world, including the biennials of Gwangju (1997), Lyon (2000), Berlin (2001), Venice for a second time (2001), Seville (2004), and the Asia Pacific Triennial (2012). Throughout 2015, his work will be showing in the traveling exhibition, Come as You Are: Art of the 1990s, opening February 8 at the Montclair Art Museum.

EXHIBITION REVIEWS

Blouin Art Info, Manuel Ocampo’s “The Corrections” at Tyler Rollins Fine Art

January, 2015


VIEW ARTICLE →

VIEW ARTICLE AT SOURCE →


GENERAL PRESS

The Philippine Star, Manuel Ocampo and Lani maestro Channel Rizal

February, 2017


VIEW ARTICLE →

VIEW ARTICLE AT SOURCE →


ARTnews, Venice Biennale 2017

October, 2016


VIEW ARTICLE →

VIEW ARTICLE AT SOURCE →


National Commission for Culture and Arts, NCCA Announces PHL Representative to 2017 Venice Art Biennale

September, 2016


VIEW ARTICLE →

VIEW ARTICLE AT SOURCE →


Fukuoka Museum – Asia Collection 100

December, 2015


VIEW ARTICLE →


Art Loft, Why Southeast Asian Art Now?

December, 2014


VIEW ARTICLE →

VIEW ARTICLE AT SOURCE →


The Guardian, Art from the Philippines showcases global influences anchored in Manila

September, 2013


VIEW ARTICLE →

VIEW ARTICLE AT SOURCE →


Asian Art Newspaper, Manuel Ocampo

February, 2013


VIEW ARTICLE →


The Wall Street Journal, A Filipino Provocateur Takes On New York

December, 2012


VIEW ARTICLE →

VIEW ARTICLE AT SOURCE →


Artforum, Manuel Ocampo

December, 2012


VIEW ARTICLE →

VIEW ARTICLE AT SOURCE →


Bastards of Misrepresentation: New York Edition

October, 2012


VIEW ARTICLE →


Art Asia Pacific, Manuel Ocampo: Never Give Up Before It’s Too Late

July, 2012


VIEW ARTICLE →


Asia Art Archive, Interview with Manuel Ocampo

October, 2011


VIEW ARTICLE →


Dublin Contemporary 2011, Manuel Ocampo

September, 2011


VIEW ARTICLE →


C-Arts, Manuel Ocampo On the Threshold of the Senses

March, 2011


VIEW ARTICLE →


Frieze, Manuel Ocampo

February, 2011


VIEW ARTICLE →


Art concerns, Up Against Interpretation: Manuel Ocampo

November, 2010


VIEW ARTICLE →


Vitamin P, Manuel Ocampo

2007


VIEW ARTICLE →


Asian Art News, Cultural Clashes And Visceral Shocks

July, 2006


VIEW ARTICLE →


Art in America, Manuel Ocampo

June, 2003


VIEW ARTICLE →


At Home & Abroad: 20 Contemporary Filipino Artists

1998


VIEW ARTICLE →


Asia/America: Identities in Contemporary Asian American Art

1994


VIEW ARTICLE →


Flash Art, Manuel Ocampo

May, 1994


VIEW ARTICLE →


The Seattle Times, Manuel Ocampo Rides The Arts Roller Coaster

February, 1994


VIEW ARTICLE →

VIEW ARTICLE AT SOURCE →


JOIN OUR EMAIL LIST

First Name
Last Name
Address
Email Address *
General Interest / Comments
WHICH ARTISTS ARE YOU INTERSTED IN?
(Check all that apply)