Pinaree Sanpitak: Quietly Floating

Installation View of Quietly Floating at Tyler Rollins Fine Art, March 4 - April 17, 2010
Installation View of Quietly Floating at Tyler Rollins Fine Art, March 4 - April 17, 2010
INSTALLATION VIEW OF QUIETLY FLOATING AT TYLER ROLLINS FINE ART, MARCH 4 - APRIL 17, 2010
INSTALLATION VIEW OF QUIETLY FLOATING AT TYLER ROLLINS FINE ART, MARCH 4 - APRIL 17, 2010
INSTALLATION VIEW OF QUIETLY FLOATING AT TYLER ROLLINS FINE ART, MARCH 4 - APRIL 17, 2010
INSTALLATION VIEW OF QUIETLY FLOATING AT TYLER ROLLINS FINE ART, MARCH 4 - APRIL 17, 2010
Quietly Floating Quietly Funny
Quietly Floating Quietly Funny, 2008
Acrylic on canvas
78 x 98 1/2 in. (198 x 250 cm)
Cloud Sprout
Cloud Sprout, 2008
Acrylic on linen
78 x 78 1/2 in. (198 x 199 cm)
Cloud Garden
Cloud Garden, 2008
Acrylic on canvas
78 x 98 1/2 in. (198 x 250 cm)
Cloud Track
Cloud Track, 2008
Acrylic on canvas
78 x 98 1/2 in. (198 x 250 cm)
Brilliant Blue
Brilliant Blue, 2008
Acrylic on canvas
78 x 98 1/2 in. (198 x 250 cm)
Cloud Mist
Cloud Mist, 2008
Acrylic on canvas
69 x 75 in. (175 x 190.5 cm)
Vermillion Sky
Vermillion Sky, 2008
Acrylic on canvas
69 x 75 in. (175 x 190.5 cm)
Dark and Sweet
Dark and Sweet, 2008
Acrylic on linen
78 x 78 in. (198 x 198 cm)
The mirror
The mirror, 2009
Aluminum and mirrored glass
37 1/2 x 76 x 7 in. (95 x 193 x 18 cm), edition of 6 + 2 AP
Quietly Floating: vessel 3
Quietly Floating: vessel 3, 2009
Acrylic on shikishi paper
9 1/2 x 10 3/4 in. (24 x 27 cm)
Quietly Floating: blue 1
Quietly Floating: blue 1, 2009
Acrylic on shikishi paper
9 1/2 x 10 3/4 in. (24 x 27 cm)
Quietly Floating: breast clouds 9
Quietly Floating: breast clouds 9, 2009
Acrylic on shikishi paper
9 1/2 x 10 3/4 in. (24 x 27 cm)
Quietly Floating: blue 3
Quietly Floating: blue 3, 2009
Acrylic on shikishi paper
9 1/2 x 10 3/4 in. (24 x 27 cm)

Pinaree Sanpitak is one of the most compelling and respected Thai artists of her generation, and her work can be counted among the most powerful explorations of women’s experience in all of Southeast Asia. For well over twenty years, her primary inspiration has been the female body, distilled to its most basic forms and imbued with an ethereal spirituality. The quiet, Zen-like abstraction of her work owes something to her training in Japan and sets it somewhat apart from the colorful intensity of much Thai art. Her rigorous focus on the female form, explored through a variety of media – painting, drawing, sculpture, textiles, ceramics, performance, and culinary arts, to name but a few – has resulted in an astoundingly varied and innovative body of work.

For many years, and certainly since the birth of her son in 1993, a central focus of her work has been the female breast, which she relates to imagery of the natural world and to the iconic forms of the Buddhist stupa (shrine) and offering bowl. Often called a feminist or Buddhist artist, she resists such easy categorizations, preferring to let her work speak to each viewer directly, to the heart and soul, with the most basic language of form, color, and texture. Her work is not lacking in a conceptual framework, but it is one informed primarily by a deeply felt spiritual sense rather than by rigid dogmas or ideological constructs.

Pinaree’s work has been featured in numerous museum exhibitions in Asia and Europe during the past twenty years, and she has participated in major biennials in Australia, Italy, Japan, and Korea. But although her work is much admired by art specialists in the United States, there has until now been little opportunity for the public, especially in New York, to see her work first hand. So it is with great pleasure that Tyler Rollins Fine Art presents her first New York solo exhibition.

Quietly Floating features a series of large, monochromatic paintings of breast and cloud forms. Some are done in a soft, metallic silver, with delicate, textured highlights, while others are infused with vibrant colors that reflect the natural light of California, where they were painted. These breast/cloud forms also appear in a remarkable group of intimate works on Japanese paper, and in an installation of large, aluminum mirrors, cast at her foundry on the outskirts of Bangkok. As the exhibition title suggests, the works convey a sense of tranquility and weightlessness that is at once otherworldly and profoundly natural. Through basic imagery of the female form, they convey a powerful sense of humanity, of the quiet truth of its physical and spiritual interconnectedness.
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CATALOGUE ESSAY
Please click here to view the Quietly Floating exhibition catalogue essay.

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ARTIST STATEMENT

Quietly Floating (Quietly Funny)

They are quietly present, floating, observing, living and hoping.

And having a bit of humor, which I consider is essential for one’s wellbeing, or at least my own.

The paintings and paper works are a continuation from a series of paintings I started in Bangkok in 2006-2007 titled Breasts and Clouds. These eight paintings were done during my artist-residency at Montalvo Arts Center, near San Francisco and finished in Santa Monica, California between April-July, 2008.

The secluded site of the residency and definitely the extraordinary light of California made a great impact on the canvases, compared with the first series. I wanted to continue my momentum in painting and pre-ordered the stretchers so that they were ready by the time I arrived at Montalvo.

Each studio/living quarters is specially designed to accommodate various practices. I was allocated the painting studio on the top of the hill. During the weekdays the fellows all gathered for dinner at the commons building down the hill, which were prepared by the culinary fellow, Jessie (Benthien) Washburn. I was able to convince Jessie to collaborate with Breast Stupa Cookery and we all shared a lovely meal for my last dinner there.

The form of “clouds” came about in a hot studio in the summer months of Bangkok in 2006. Later a friend told me that there’s a word in Pali/Sanskrit called Pa-yo-ta-ra which means beholder of water and beholder of milk. True to their nature, they are both givers and receivers. Sensitive and unpredictable. Ever-changing.

I work between 2 and 3 dimensions and with a wide range of materials. It creates a dialogue and challenge between me and the works and between the works themselves. I enjoy the collaboration and interactions of my works as much as my solitude when working quietly by myself in the studio.

The Mirror reflects and absorbs while the Breast Stupa Cookery molds reveal and offer.

The breast forms are still evolving. They are personal but sharing an open view.

They are about attitudes. They are about life. They are about perspectives. They are about the senses.

Life is quiet, solid.

Pinaree Sanpitak
February 2010